Ain’t That A Kick

There’s a very important lesson to learn when covering sports. Don’t bad mouth something you don’t understand.

Some folks don’t like golf or baseball. I’m not a soccer fan, but I watched the Women’s World Cup Final on Sunday afternoon.

So did you. So did everyone. How could you not?

President Obama tweeted about the game. Tom Hanks said he had tears in his eyes during the national anthem.

On a day reserved for the NFL, the entire country watched a different kind of football. These players don’t make a dime for their efforts. It’s all about country.

It’s Abby, Hope, Alex and the rest of the girls who make folks who don’t know the difference between a corner kick and a crossing pass tune into the game against Japan. How many people actually even knew the opponent on Sunday afternoon?

The United States team was in the final.

Our team.

What do we do on the 4th of July? We watch fireworks. What do we do when the United States lands in the final of any sport? We make it the most important aspect of our day.

We anxiously watched a first half of listless, scoreless football to be rewarded with a goal in the 69th minute by Alex Morgan, the youngest member of the squad. A turnover tied the game late in the second half.  You expect these women to make it exciting, right?

And then Abby won it. With her head.

Except she didn’t. Japan tied the game in the waning moments.

Penalty kicks? This is how they decide a champion?

It wasn’t really close in PKs. But you know that already.

They shouldn’t have made the final.  Wambach’s noggin in the quarterfinal against Brazil “saved their life,” as dynamite broadcaster Ian Darke so aptly put it.

This team wanted to leave the magical summer of 1999 in the past and concentrate on the present.

“I’m tired of being compared to the ’99 team,” goalie Hope Solo said before the game.

There’s no comparison. They won.

Get an instant “Dash of Dachille” on Twitter. Follow him at WBALDash. You can also “like” Dash on Facebook. Just search “Dash of Dachille.”

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